Ami Clarke

Ami Clarke artist website

 


Ami Clarke Portfolio of recent works.


please go to full screen for all video material





For full details on all of the Un-Publish series see here: http://www.bannerrepeater.org/un-publish

     






A Throw Of The Dice Will Never Abolish Chance, Sept - Nov 2016 at Banner Repeater and online.



 


Works in the exhibition space were considered 'data' as part of a speculative puzzle which formed the site for discursive open workshops on the blockchain: Thinking through the Block, with invited speakers: Tom Clark, Paul Purgas, Alessandro Ludovico, Karen Di Franco, Ruth Catlow, Ben Vickers, Tom Pearson, and surfatial that includes: Malavika Rajnarayan, Prayas Abhinav and Satya Gummuluri


back wall: Haring tag hashtag sturtevant, online here: http://ecksenis.net/20/ (developed by Ami Clarke, under the proxy x-fx.org with programming by Anne de Boer) linked to live here:

http://ecksenis.net/20/



Embedded within the online work in the project space a video hints at the mythologies and rumour that fuel the story of the blockchain, through glimpses of a local home-grown bitcoin mining rig. These works wait, expectantly, for further development through two discursive workshops experimenting with publishing through the blockchain.

large monitor: untitled, data collection from local bitcoin mining rig, by x-fx.org, HD video (2016)

floor: dust, scraper, fan 2.5, and dust, scraper, fan 2.6, by Yuri Pattison, which includes an original copy of the new acquisition to the Banner Repeater archive Pretty Good Privacy by Phillip Zimmerman.


There were also copies of the new Un-Publish 2.07 commission by Yuri Pattison to take away for free.




right hand wall (left to right) long shelf: Ami Clarke, Author of the Blank Swan (2016)

small screen: screen capture of 3D render of clay cuneiform table, with astronomical procedure text for Jupiter: Mathematical rules for the area of a trapezoid

small shelf: Elaine Sturtevant: Author of the Quixote (2009).




A Throw Of The Dice Will Never Abolish Chance.


press release


From the romantic origins of Stéphane Mallarmé’s text “Un coup de dès jamais n’abolira le hasard” - a throw of the dice will never abolish chance - we consider new ways of thinking through the centuries old puzzle of code, numbers and language.  Mallarmé’s famous typographic layout of words on the page, hover for some as a precursor to the concrete poetry of performative code, that from a modernist perspective proved ideological in its refutation of ideology, as well as metaphysics. Mallarmé’s text also resonates through Roland Barthes interpretation, and the advent of the reader, whilst a more recent study by the philosopher Quentin Meillassoux, draws out matters of contingency and chance, through an indeterminate code.
 
Acting as a moving configuration that materialises in several forms throughout the exhibition period, an online work hovers as a ‘holding page’ projected into the project space as a site of speculation for further works to develop. The work draws on the late Elaine Sturtevant’s early practice of making works of other artists works through Haring Tag and Elie Ayache’s writing on contingency in his book The Blank Swan - with a copy of the publication Elaine Sturtevant: Author of the Quixote also on display.  Embedded within the online work in the project space a video hints at the mythologies and rumour that fuel the story of the blockchain, through glimpses of a local home-grown bitcoin mining rig.  These works wait, expectantly, for further development through two discursive workshops experimenting with publishing through the blockchain, and how these ideas might bring about new ways of working, and instituting - with invited contributors: Tom Clark, Ruth Catlow, Alessandro Ludovico, Karen Di Franco, and Ben Vickers.

The very first block of data in Bitcoin; the Genesis block, contained a “secret” message inscribed within it of The Times (UK) headline commenting on the fallibility of the current banking system: 'The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks'.  A recent news headline reports on the UK Government trials of blockchain technology in the Welfare Payments system, partnering with Barclays Bank. The workshops aim to discuss the several, and possibly contradictory claims made regarding the blockchain, whilst developing a digital puzzle of our findings, that will be inscribed, ascribed, and described through the block.





Thinking through the block workshops


more details can be found here: http://www.bannerrepeater.org/thinking-through-the-block-workshop

 

22nd Oct and 12th Nov Saturday 3-6pm

 

Continuing our focus on publishing as process, where important precedents in publishing provide insights into present day protocols of engagement in network culture, we will be holding two open workshops experimenting with publishing through the blockchain, and how this might bring about new ways of working, and instituting.  The very first block of data in Bitcoin; the Genesis block, contained a “secret” message inscribed within it of The Times (UK) headline commenting on the fallibility of the current banking system: 'The Times 03/Jan/2009 Chancellor on brink of second bailout for banks'.  A recent news headline reports on the UK Government trials of blockchain technology in the Welfare Payments system, partnering with Barclays Bank. The workshops aim to discuss the possibly contradictory claims made regarding the blockchain, whilst developing a digital puzzle of our findings, that will be inscribed, ascribed, and described through the block. 

 

The workshops are open to everyone, with invited contributors: Tom Clark, Paul Purgas, Alessandro Ludovico, Karen Di Franco, Ruth Catlow, Ben Vickers, Tom Pearson, and sufatial comprising of: Malavika Rajnarayan, Prayas Abhinav and Satya Gummuluri.

 

We will be considering ideas that include the most immediate use of the block to attribute to all digital artefacts authorship and hence intellectual property, and copyright, whilst asking:

 

·       In what way does the blockchain differ significantly from earlier precedents such as: ISSN, ISBN?

·       how might we use the potential of blockchain to develop alternative models of sharing?

·       how are differing contractual agreements being developed - dependent on usage and user?

·       how might these operate within an economy that has been described primarily as a gift economy?

·       how might blockchain facilitate the development of new institutional models?

·       what can we learn from previous precedents that share similar attributes to blockchain in archival projects?

·       how might blockchain, with it’s capacity to render all items ultimately searchable, perhaps shut-down previous modes of working? that include: copying and appropriation, as just two examples.

 

An the online digital puzzle develops through the workshops we will include written and visual contributions, leaving traces in the chain, and displayed in the project space as a work in progress.





The audio captured from the workshops is being produced as one of the parts in the online puzzle that will be x-fx.org - which is currently still in production.  (Image above)











full details here: https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/technology-now-elie-ayache-and-ami-clarke





Ami Clarke, Author of the BLANK Swan.


Ayache writes, whilst reading Nassim Taleb’s Black Swan, that the “biggest surprise is when we come upon our own thoughts in a text that is not our own”.


As I read Ayache’s Blank Swan, I felt compelled to act in accord with what was demanded by the text, leading to my ‘writing’ of Chapter 4: Writing and the Market, and the publication of: Ami Clarke, Author of the BLANK Swan launched at a talk for the Technology Now series at the ICA.


In confronting “the immanence that the market represents”, Ayache finds an equivalence in ‘writing’, to ‘pricing’ in the derivatives market.  Sharing the figure of the fictional writer in the Borges short story, Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote, Elaine Sturtevant and Elie Ayache charter similar territories. Sturtevant‘s early practice, of making works of other artists works, pushed the “codification of artists to specific signifiers”  (Lee 2016) in relation to the structures and systems of art within which these signs act.  Sturtevant’s emphasis on “the brutal truth of the work is that it is not a copy” is shared in Ayache’s thinking when she claims “the dynamics of the work is that it throws out representation” (Lee 2016). 

 

Ayache’s work primarily brings us to a point at which we can differentiate between probability and contingency.  What it is to act in the immanence that the market represents, for Ayache, doesn’t amount to much, in terms of what we might previously have thought of as agential.  What it might amount to, though, is an account of what it is to act within the field of difference that is probability theory.









Performed at the ICA in the large auditorium during Liquidity symposium, Dec, 2015.

Ami Clarke reading (take 7) from her on-going script: 'Error-Correction: an introduction to future diagrams' with 'Low Animal Spirits' - a live HFT algorithm trading in world news by Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane.  Take 7 focus’ on materiality, algorithms, and an evolving subjectivity, with a nod to “Capitalism and Schizophrenia: Contemporary Visual Culture and the Acceleration of Identity Formation/Dissolution” [sic] by Jonah Peretti – founder of Buzz-feed.


 

‘Error-Correction; an introduction to future diagrams’, is an experimental script asking what kind of articulation is possible, whilst exploring the limits of contemporary art, within a differential economy, as an increasingly general condition.

The work Error-Correction: an introduction to future diagrams, is a series of ‘takes’ in an ongoing script, that attempts to operate at the micro-temporal level of mimesis, through a strategy of open appropriation, that amounts to the replication of other people’s words, whereby the voice, through language, is constituted “between someone else’s thoughts and the page’.  

 

The script developed from theoretical and historical cross-disciplinary research into diagrams, and diagramming, as a way of thinking through a history of human spatio-temporal relations depicted through single point and perspectival drawing, to projected geometry, and further, beyond the human sensorium via abstraction in mathematics and quantum physics, that problematise previously held classic mechanical models of representation, siting an object in space. The title stems from the ideas of the German physician and physicist Herman von Helmholtz, who's research into mathematics of the eye brought him to the conclusion that they were exceptionally prone to error, an approximation at best, that 'operate(s) within the protocols of instruments' - an 'error-correction' of sorts. These ideas led to probability theory and the abstract language of mathematical analysis in celestial mechanics and situated theory as the engine to extend enquiry into domains beyond the human sensorium and beyond visual representation.

 

The open appropriation of texts, reference and include; contemporary commentary, news items, as well as anecdotal evidence, high theory, as well as low, and, as such, employs a deliberate use of what Alix Rule and David Levine describe as an ‘almost pornographic use of language’ in their critique of International Art Language “On the rise - and the space - of the art-world press release”.

 

 

 



The performance/reading Error-Correction and Low Animal Spirits, has been performed/read at: 

Liquidity conference at the ICA, 2015,

The Practice of Theories, Wysing Arts Centre, February, 2016,

Forms of Criticism, University of Westminster, Parasol Unit, London, 2016,

Cold Bodies, Warm Machines - panel convened by Luciana Parisi, Goldsmiths, conference NRW Forum, Dusseldorf, September, 2016,

Words of Art conference at Wimbledon School of Art, December, 2016.











Simultaneously, whilst Error-Correction: an introduction to future diagrams was being read at Cold Bodies, Warm Machines, Dusseldorf, Melania Trump was enveigled to read Error-Correction: an introduction to future diagrams at the Artists' Self Publishing fair at ICA, London, September 2016. 

more details here: https://www.ica.org.uk/whats-on/artist-self-publishers-fair-asp-sequel





In the Pull of Time by Ami Clarke.




You can download the text with full footnotes here: 


http://webzoom.freewebs.com/amiclarke/2014/Scott_Mason_oafaif v9_Final Ami Clarke.pdf


In the Pull of Time by Ami Clarke is a published take, with full references to all appropriated texts, as one in several takes from the Error-Correction: an introduction to future diagrams series.

 

Experimental text work - In the Pull of Time by Ami Clarke was commissioned for ‘of a final account in formation’ by Scott Mason, MK gallery, Sept 2014.

Texts by,
V. Allen,
Harry Burke,
Ami Clarke,
Chris Fite-Wassilak,
John Hill,
Elizabeth Holdsworth,
Chris Kraus,
Martí Manen,
Rasmus Nilausen,
Lisa Radon,
Holly Stevenson.

Published by renaro. 2014.

 

http://www.mkgallery.org/shop/product/of_a_final_account_in_formation_publication/







Error-correction: an introduction to future diagrams in The Practice of Theories, Wysing Arts Centre 2016.

several material articulations that included animation:





 

Low Animal Spirits by Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane 2014.




Low Animal Spirits installed at Hayward Gallery 2014.





Low Animal Spirits installed at Banner Repeater 2014.


Low Animal Spirits by Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane 2014.
Installation at Banner Repeater - with support from The Elephant Trust and ACE.

Low Animal Spirits by Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane is an HFT algorithm driven by real time data, scripted as a live onscreen score and audio work with automated ‘readers’. Taking its cue from the oft-mentioned loss of the referent in both language and the economy, it is a live model of high fre- quency trading, dealing in words sourced from global news feeds for virtual ‘profit’, whilst speculating on their usage. The analysis produces new phenomena in the form of headlines generated with the help of Natural Language processing algorithms, tweeted @lowanimalspirit.

The visualization you see projected (this is always shown v large) is a glimpse into the HFT algorithms buying and selling activity with volatility at the centre of these concerns.  It accesses 994 English Language global news feeds ‘live’ and acts upon the data as if it were trading in the global market place, analysing words in terms of the potential for a virtual ‘profit’ to be made.  You are watching what is about to trend, and likewise, the speculative headline generator is trying quite hard to anticipate the next headline, based on recent history, and incoming headlines, with the help of a Natural Language Processing algorithm.

 

The work address’ concerns relating to how algorithms curate big data, daily, and hence are reshaping knowledge production today.  It takes these ideas to an intensified degree via a High Frequency Trading algorithm – applying high speed algorithmic methods to the global production of news, it’s distribution and reception - and raises further concerns relating to the production of new knowledge, as a result.


Please see press here:

Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane Low Animal Spirits review by Lizzie Homersham. Art Monthly no 382. Dec-Jan 14-15. http://www.bannerrepeater.org/press

Art Project at East London Train Station Tweets Speculative Headlines to Affect Stock Market Algorithms. No, Really. by Phoebe Stubbs. http://www.artslant.com/lon/articles/show/40931


Low Animal Spirits, Banner Repeater, London. Review by Laura Davidson.  http://thisistomorrow.info/articles/low-animal-spirits








Breaking News – Flash Crash (2014) by Ami Clarke.





          


Breaking News - Flash Crash - mild steel bar, 894mm x 618mm.

 

Associated Press twitter hacked - Breaking: Two Explosions in the White House and Barak Obama is injured. Flash Crash 2013 - 1 percent in 1 minute - “it’ll happen again, it’s a matter of when”.

 

In 2013 the Associated Press twitter account was hacked and the above tweet was sent. 

 

Reported on 23 Apr 2013 14:04:

 

“Hackers caused a mini stock market "flash crash" this afternoon after sending a bogus tweet from a hacked Associated Press (AP) Twitter account. The tweet, read that there were explosions at the White House and President Barack Obama had been injured. The account was quickly shut down, but the damage had been done. U.S. markets, including the Dow Jones and S&P 500 fell 1 percent in one minute before rebounding. White House spokesperson Jay Carney quickly dismissed the story by saying the President was doing just fine. The AP has had all of its Twitter accounts suspended.” Andrew Yoskowitz – After Dawn – News.

 

Also reported in the Washington Post, AP Twitter Hack Sends Stock Market Spinning and NYMag: Breaking News - Flash Crash, and many others.











@LowAnimalSpirit (twitter feed) by Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane 2014.





 

Low Animal Spirits produces new phenomena in the form of speculative headlines, with the help of Natural Language Processing algorithms, and tweets these into the twittersphere every 2 minutes via @LowAnimalSpirit twitter account.

 

@LowAnimalSpirit is followed on twitter by some humans, but also by a cluster of twitter bots, who RT words that they pick up on - such as Ebola_news_now.

 

@LowAnimalSpirit was recently written about in bot weekly – a blog whose writer specializes in the creative uses of twitter bots.

 

@LowAnimalSpirit is currently in End User at the Hayward Gallery project space, and A Pixel or Digit? curated by Turf projects at Croydon Art Gallery, and tweets daily.



@LowAnimalSpirit (twitter feed) speculative headlines by Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane 2014.



@LowAnimalSpirit speculative headlines printed on Financial Times Salmon Pink newspaper, A2.

 

The speculative headlines generated by @LowAnimalSpirit are printed onto Financial Times Salmon Pink newspaper at a typical A-board advertising size of A2, and displayed with a selection of Banner Repeater publishing, and notable precedents in Artists’ Publishing at Generator Projects, Dundee.



Scrolling LED sign displaying @LowAnimalSpirit’s speculative headline tweets live.

@LowAnimalSpirit twitter feed scrolling LED sign. from Ami Clarke on Vimeo.

The above shows video footage of the scrolling LED sign currently in the Hayward Gallery foyer

- it shows the sign starting up, waiting for the first tweet to come through.



The scrolling LED sign displays @LowAnimalSpirit’s speculative headline tweets live, as they are tweeted. 

 

The ticker tape was the earliest digital communications medium, transmitting stock price information over telegraph lines.  As computers and television took over communications the concept of the ticker tape remained, to be seen scrolling in electronic form across brokerage walls and as financial updates on television. 

 

The events in the US on September 11th 2001 brought about the now ubiquitous use of the ticker tape, through the need to display a continuous stream of vital but repetitive emergency information to viewers.   They signal the advent of 24-hr rolling news as a phenomena, and speak of the demands on broadcasters to supply a constant supply of updated news.





Error-Correction: An introduction to Future Diagrams series - Impossible Structures “the eye that remains of the me that was I”.



Impossible Structures “the eye that remains of the me that was I” (Error-Correction: an introduction to future diagrams (take 3)) by Ami Clarke.

 

https://vimeo.com/116488058 

 

A whispered visual/audio work made available through a downloadable app that provides the ideal conditions for the work to be listened to – one to one, on headphones, kept in your pocket a little like a paperback.

 

It is one in a series of experimental takes of an on-going enquiry into diagrams, that reference and include appropriated texts, contemporary commentary; news items, as well as anecdotal evidence, culminating in an interrelated convergence of many interwoven threads, whereby the voice, through language, is constituted “between someone else’s thoughts and the page’, and considers the pro- duction of meaning through inference, association, paradox, and contradiction. Take 3 was com- piled within the Brutalist architecture of the Barbican and the artists tendency to get lost within this structure, and it’s location within the Corporation of London (which has a legal system outside of normal UK legislation) in relation to the new digital storage space/proposed commons of the Cloud.













Data-Pool 3 series - NOT GOT SHOT OFF


With reference to the transcripts of evidence given during The Leveson Enquiry.


NOT GOT SHOT OFF (2 x 30 second looped 16mm film: simultaneous double projection)

 

A live capture of the projection at Expanded Film, curated by Guy Sherwin, in conjunction with Lucy Reynolds collective work: Anthology, Camden Arts Centre, Jan, 2013. (including: Annabel Frearson, Lizzie Hughes, Gil Lueng, Liliane Lijn, Sharon Kivland, Helene Martine, Annabel Nicolson, Sharon Morris, Sally O Reilly, Clunie Reid, Lis Rhodes, Audrey Reynolds, Cherry Smyth, Erika Tan, Anne Tallentire and Sarah Tripp.)

 

http://www.amiclarke.com/notgotshotoff.htm

 

Experimental text work from the same source as Data Pool 3 (Text reference The Leveson Enquiry, 2012) - continuing the serial work: Data Pool 3 (end-game) as an enquiry reversing the usual technological teleology. The double projection plays the text at odds with any meaning that may be had, as they slip out of synch, until chance brings them to re-align again, briefly, before stuttering on.


The text is taken from Andy Coulson's testimony during the Leveson Enquiry where he argued, in his defense, for an understanding of the two potentially different meanings of 'shot of' and 'shot off'.  Andy Coulson was found guilty and jailed for 18 months in relation to the phone hacking scandal.








Data-Pool 3 series




DATA-POOL 3 (2.09 mins HD video, 2012)

 

https://vimeo.com/48708458

 

A series of experimental works considering an obscured but current text in the public domain (The Leveson Enquiry), that bears witness to the recent and increasingly exposed construction of consensus, arising from a bias in spectacular news reporting: an over-simplified ‘victims-and-aggressor’ meme, flocking from one focus of this sort to another, (and not unique to the tabloid) that performs a particularly consistent form of reality management, paradoxically by the very enactment of slippage in textual meaning.

 

The text is taken from Rebekah Brooks testimony where she discusses the instance of her team 'imaging' the data on her phone, that included the exchanges between herself and the then Prime Minister David Cameron, that as a consequence,  completely vanished from all their records.









Curatorial.

SNOW CRASH


Group exhibition with Erica Scourti, Anna Barham, Tyler Coburn, Yuri Pattison and Ami Clarke, 2014.



“As the sun sets, it’s red light is supplanted by the light of many neon logos emanating from the franchise ghetto that constitutes this U-Stor-It’s natural habitat. This light, known as loglo, fills in the shadowy corners of the unit with seedy, oversaturated colours.

 

The business is a simple one. Hiro gets information. It may be gossip, videotape, audiotape, a fragment of a computer disk, a xerox of a document. It can even be a joke based on the latest highly publicised disaster.

 

He uploads it to the CIC database - - the Library, formerly the Library of Congress, but no one calls it that anymore. Most people are not entirely clear on what the word “congress” means.


And even the word “library” is getting hazy. It used to be a place full of books, mostly old ones. Then they began to include videotapes, records, and magazines. Then all of the information got converted into machine-readable form, which is to say, ones and zeroes. And as the number of media grew, the material became more up to date, and the methods for searching the Library became more up to date, and as the methods for searching the Library became more and more sophisticated, it approached the point where there was no substantive difference between the Library of Congress and the Central Intelligence Agency. Fortuitously, this happened just as the government was falling apart anyway. So they merged and kicked out a big fat stock offering.”   (Neal Stephenson: Snow Crash, 1992.)







  

In Neal Stephenson’s science fiction of 1992, Snow Crash is a computer virus that can also infect humans; “crashing their neocortical software and turning them into mechanized entities who have no choice but to run the programs fed into them” and provides the subtext for concerns relating to the erosion of subjectivity and what amounts to free will. Two different types of language are identified by the software: ‘the librarian’, one that functions as an operating system for the brain, meta-viral protocols for living, and the other that operates as a counter virus seemingly liberating the people through self-reflection. Writing in 1992 Stephenson is intent on privileging the remnants of the liberal self that constitute the individual that notably is produced by market relations and do not predate this. In the intervening decades it can be seen that increasingly through the application of big data, both surveillance and marketing drives thrive, whilst structural feedback loops ‘reify and reinforce certain cultural, racial, gendered assumptions and misconceptions, limiting users to a particular stream and thus perspective’.

 

Blurring the lines between what we might regard as code where ‘saying’ coincides with ‘doing’, through the problems inherent to computational linguistics where language resists easy processing, artists’ works emerge from the tangle of human and multi-media assemblage, leading to ideas of the decentred human subject through their production.

 

The recursivities that entangle inscription with incorporation, the body with embodiment... invite us to see these polarities not as static concepts but as mutating surfaces that transform into one another,” ...”technology not only as a theme but as an articulation capable of producing new kinds of subjectivities”.


Please see press here -  Snow Crash review by Chris Fite-Wasslak in Art Monthly June 2014 no 377: http://www.bannerrepeater.org/press




Publishing as Process : An exhibition of artists’ publishing by Banner Repeater, September 2016.

http://www.dundee.ac.uk/djcad/exhibitions/exhibitions/banner-repeater/









Publishing as Process : An exhibition of artists’ publishing by Banner Repeater

9 – 29 September 2016

 

Centrespace, Visual Research Centre, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design 

Dundee Contemporary Arts

 

An exhibition of Artists’ books and prints from the experimental art space Banner Repeater,including those recently acquired for abcD, DJCAD’s artists’ book collection, Dundee. The works exhibited are drawn from Banner Repeater’s Archive of Artists’ Publishing, the imprints: Banner Repeater paperbacks and the UN-PUBLISH series, and co-presented alongside selected books from the abcD collection.
 
Sited significantly on a working train station platform in Hackney, Banner Repeater is an experimental project space and reading room with an onsite public Archive dedicated to Artists Publishing and soon to be launched Digital Archive of Artists publishing: BookBlast.  It has an ongoing arts programme of newly commissioned works with exhibitions, lectures, and performances, and publication launches. Driven by it’s location, Banner Repeater is dedicated to developing critical art in the natural interstice the platform and incidental footfall of over 4,000 passengers a day provides. Integral to its operation is the distribution of artists publishing straight into a main artery of the city of London. 
 
Installation photography by Jacquetta Clark
 
 
Banner Repeater developed from a sense of location that includes footfall and the inter-related networks/structures that it sits within through a diagrammatic reading of the project as a site of affective experimentation. As a site rich in a historical sense it provides an opportunity to reflect on more recent technologies in terms of what might blur the lines between publishing and broadcasting, via social media and other networked connectivities, and an evolving subjectivity that emerges through market relations.  As such, an emphasis on performative and processual articulations has developed, that come of an expanded idea of publishing as a means to consider what might amount to ‘criticality’ within our accelerating technicity.   
 
The Curator’s Talk accompanying the exhibition on Thursday 8 September will focus on ideas of ‘Publishing as Process’, and will pick up on several publications developed with artists during exhibitions.  She will also touch upon the recent publication of her 'writing' Chapter 4 of the French financier Elie Ayache’s influential book The Blank Swan: The End of Probability, and how this might differ from previous ideas of copying and appropriation, to repeat the contingency of the text.

Banner Repeater publications under discussion include: the UN-PUBLISH series with contributions from: Yuri Pattison, Nina Power, Arcadia_Missa, orbits.com, El Impublicado (The Unpublisher) with Mexican writers/artists: Nadia Cortes, Miguel Trancozo, and Isaac Olvera, The Outage by Erica Scourti, the collective writing project On Demand, and Ami Clarke: Author of the Blank Swan.
 


Curator’s Biography

Ami Clarke is an artist whose practice explores the limits of contemporary art within a differential economy as an increasingly general condition. Recent public events include a live performance at the ICA London in December 2015 and a discussion with Elie Ayache, in the Technology Now series at the ICA in July 2016. Clarke is also founder of Banner Repeater. She has recently exhibited/curated works at Wysing Arts Centre, ICA, Museo Del Chopo - Mexico City, Hayward Gallery, collaborated with Cuss Group SA at Ithuba Gallery (British Council connect ZA), David Roberts Arts Foundation, Camden Arts Centre and The Container, Japan.  She continues to commission new artists/writers works through Banner Repeater, and several publishing imprints: Banner Repeater paperbacks, and the UN-PUBLISH series.  She teaches across the UK with a focus on Publishing, Distribution and Dissemination: post-digital art production and publishing.
 





BANNER REPEATER ARCHIVE OF ARTISTS' PUBLISHING + LOW ANIMAL SPIRIT

WITH ISAAC OLVERA: THE DEATH OF PAPER at MUSEO UNIVERSITARIO DEL CHOPO, MEXICO CITY.

Exhibition: 16th April - 28th June 2015.

Banner Repeater presents a selection of works from the Banner Repeater Archive of Artists' Publishing at Museo Universitario Del Chopo, Mexico City.

In tandem with the selection of Artists’ Publishing, a new installation of Low Animal Spirits by Ami Clarke and Richard Cochrane is presented at Museo Universitario Del Chopo.

more details here: http://www.bannerrepeater.org/banner-repeater-archive-at-del-chopo









El Impublicado (The Unpublisher) was produced with 3 artists and writers who attended the four seminars that were held on Publishing as Process during the residency period.  El Impublicado took the Mexican newspaper El Economista as it's format.